Headlines — July 11, 2022

July 11, 2022

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Women’s Health Clinics In Colorado Has Already Seen Increase In Patients 

Colorado health clinics have almost doubled the number of abortion services they are providing to out-of-state clients. According to the Colorado Sun, in an effort to expand access, reproductive healthcare providers are increasing telehealth consultations and mobile clinics across the state. Others are stockpiling Plan B.

Later in the show, we’ll hear from KGNU’s Carl Armen, who went to a reproductive rights rally on Saturday. 

Boulder Valley Women’s Health Clinic has been around since 1973. The providers told the Colorado Sun that patients go for abortions, but people are also there for breast and cervical exams, gender-affirming care, routine annual exams, and other preventive care.

At Least Five People Have Died On Lake Pueblo This Year

According to The Denver Post, on Saturday a woman passed away in a boating accident on Lake Pueblo. This is the second death in about two days on the lake and she is at least the fifth person to have died on the lake this year. 

In May, a boat with 13 people on it capsized and two people died. In July a swimmer drowned and in June, the lake had back-to-back deaths, both from drowning. 

State park officials have been stressing the importance of water safety while still having fun. Safety measures include wearing a life jacket, knowing the weather and water conditions, and staying sober while out on the water. 

Bridget Kochel, a spokeswoman for Colorado Parks and Wildlife told The Denver Post, “We don’t want people to be scared of the water. We want people to have fun. We just need to stress how important it is to be safe.”

Demonstrators Call For Rent Control Measures

Demonstrators gathered on the steps of the Capitol in Denver Sunday to call for legislative action to allow local governments to implement measures to control skyrocketing rents. 

With the cost of living across the country skyrocketing, many families in Colorado are struggling to keep up. Inflation and high gas prices are contributing factors, but rent hikes on already high rent are hitting many families particularly hard, especially those led by single parents.

Around 50 people gathered in the heat on the West steps of the Capitol Sunday to demand a repeal of a rent stabilization ban that the state legislature enacted back in 1981. The ban prevents local state governments from adopting rent stabilization policies appropriate for each local circumstance. The Colorado Supreme Court upheld to ban in 2000 after the mountain resort town of Telluride attempted to control skyrocketing rents within its limits.

Among the rally attendees was Denver City Council President Pro Tem Jamie Torres.  “What we’re experiencing in west Denver is an infusion of investment purchases of homes. …those homes will never come back to the market. They will never come back to individual purchasers, so they will always be rented.” 

Repealing the 1981 rent control ban would require legislative action and the legislature is out of session until January of 2023. Housing rights advocates and families that attended Sunday’s rally want elected officials to take action.

Fire Started By Lighting In Boulder 

Around 3 PM on Sunday, a lightning strike started a fire at the intersection of Olde Stage Road and Red Hill Road in NW Boulder.

According to The Daily Camera, first responders found two trees and a nearly 20-foot by 20-foot section of grass on fire when they arrived. There was no damage to nearby property.

Boulder Historians Upset Over Possible Demolition Of Hotel 

The Millenium Harvest Hotel may be demolished and turned into student housing. Historic Boulder says the city made the decision to demolish the building without public input. 

Historic Boulder Executive Director Leonard Segel, told The Daily Camera, “It’s the largest building that is ever going to be demolished and it is over 50 years old, we’re just wondering why there was no public review for that.”

The hotel would be turned into three four-story buildings, with a total of 931 rooms and 245 apartment units. 

Boulder’s Planning Board and City Council have approved the conceptual plan for development. To continue they will need site approval from the planning board and city council.