Headlines July 16, 2020

Headlines July 16, 2020

Listen here:

(Download Audio)

Governor Jared Polis this afternoon announced a state-wide mask ordinance which means that every Coloradoan older than 10 will be required to wear a mask or face covering in all indoor spaces.
The order, which goes into effect at midnight, comes as the state is experiencing an uptick in coronavirus cases. Polis said that the state would exceed its ICU capacity by September if the current rate of coronavirus infections continues.
Denver Mayor Michael Hancock, and Aurora Mayor Mike Coffman also spoke at today’s press conference. Hancock said the city has heard from businesses and residents who are concerned about people not wearing masks, despite Denver having a face-covering ordinance for the past two months.
Hancock said the statewide ordinance will help with compliance.  “This statewide order is a powerful, powerful tool for all of us across the state,” he said.
The Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory along with the private land trust, Colorado Open Lands has preserved the ghost town, Gothic, located near Crested Butte.
The Denver Post reports that this is believed to be the first time in Colorado that an entire town has been placed under a conservation easement. This will preserve the area which is highly prized for its scientific, educational and environmental values.
Since 1928 the historic mining town of Gothic has been home to the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory.
Gothic turned into a ghost town after the silver market went bust. John Johnson, a biology professor at Western Colorado College, set up a research field station there.
Since then, thousands of scientists and students have spent time there researching climate change, pollination, high-altitude ecosystems and acid rain. The trust now preserves the 270-acre site, high in the Elk Mountains, for research and education in perpetuity.

Listen here:

(Download Audio)

Denver Public Schools announced Wednesday that they are considering delaying the start of school until August 24 to increase the amount of time teachers have to prepare for a highly unusual school year — and decrease the number of hot August days that students and staff will be in classrooms.
In a statement on the district’s website, Superintendent Susana Cordova said they are considering a staggered start schedule, which would allow all schools to begin in a virtual or remote format and gradually phase students back into classrooms.

Cordova says DPS has worked with health officials to develop plans for both fully in-person and hybrid education models as health data allows.
The school district said it expects to be able to share more details on Monday, July 20.

A draft of the school district’s plan was obtained by the Denver Post which reports it includes measures like a shortened school day and changing music lessons as singing and wind instruments will not be permitted.

The St. Vrain Valley School District told parents and teachers on Wednesday that it is continuing to revise, refine, and update plans for the start of the school year.

District Superintendent Don Haddad said that a detailed community letter will be emailed to all families, teachers, and staff at the end of next week regarding various schedules and models related to in-person learning, hybrid learning, and fully online/remote learning options for our families.

Next Wednesday, July 22, the St. Vrain Valley School District Board of Education will meet with public health experts from Boulder County to further discuss the status of the pandemic and to review current plans for the start of the upcoming school year. The meeting will be live-streamed through Longmont Public Media at 6:00 p.m.
Senator Cory Gardner was met by a group of protestors outside a high-donor fundraiser at a private home in an exclusive Longmont neighborhood on Thursday evening. The group, chanting “Cory do your job!” waved banners and flags on issues from health care to immigration and displayed a message of “Still No Waver,” a reference to Trump’s statement that Gardner has never wavered in support of this President.

When they asked for Sen Gardner to come out and meet, they were told by a partygoer, “Cory Gardner has a different agenda.”

Cory Gardner has managed to arrange private in-person and virtual meetings around Colorado over the past few months since the COVID-19 pandemic began. In addition to last night’s fundraiser in Longmont, a week ago he was in Mesa County at a GOP event.