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Regenerative Agriculture in Boulder County

Posted: January 4, 2018 at 3:09 pm by , in A Public Affair, Breaking News, Featured

Boulder County owns approximately 100,000 acres of open space land and of that approximately 25,000 are protected as agricultural lands and leased to farmers. As such, everyone in the County, not just farmers, has a stake in agriculture. With a growing awareness about the value of regenerative agricultural practices in developing healthy soils that could capture carbon and mitigate climate change impacts, we discuss the role that the County plays in facilitating sustainable farming. We also hear from some farmers who are engaging in regenerative agricultural practices.

 

The panelists are Blake Cooper, Boulder County’s Agriculture Coordinator for Parks and Open Space, Brian Coppom, Director of the Boulder County Farmers Market, Rod Brueske, a Longmont farmer and Walt Pounds a Boulder County farmer.

There is a citizens group currently forming that is looking to implement carbon sequestration research in 2018, gathering data at a handful of existing Boulder County farms. Walt Pounds’ farm is one that is currently being looked at for inclusion in the study.

Boulder County is seeking input from residents in the county regarding how the current Land Use Code and other regulations affect agricultural operations, as part of its Agriculture Outreach Project. People can complete a survey by January 12th. There will be an open house on January 18th from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Ron Stewart Parks & Open Space Administration Building, 5201 St. Vrain Road, Longmont, where additional input can be given.

MAD Agriculture is a monthly series looking at regenerative agricultural practices that happens at the Altona Grange in Longmont. The next forum happens January 11th and will discuss the Boulder County Land Use Policy.

The Soil Revolution conference took place in Longmont in December, bringing local and national farmers and agriculture experts together to talk about soil health. Rod Brueske spoke with Dale Strickler, an agronomist with Green Cover Seed, the nation’s leading cover crop specific company and a leader in the soil health movement.